Resource Details

Root architecture and allocation patterns of eight native tropical species with different successional status used in open-grown mixed plantations in Panama

Literature: Journal Articles

Coll, L., Potvin, C., Messier, C. & Delagrange, S. 2008, "Root architecture and allocation patterns of eight native tropical species with different successional status used in open-grown mixed plantations in Panama", Trees - Structure and Function, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 585-596.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: lluis.coll@ctfc.es

Affiliations

  • Universite du Quebec a Montreal
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Department of Biology 
  • McGill University
  • Centre Tecnologic Forestal de Catalunya (CTFC),
  • Institut Quebecois d’Amenagement de la Foret Feuillue,

Link(s)

Trees - Structure and Function

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Species Info

  • Luehea seemannii 
  • Cordia alliodora
  • Antirrhoea trichantha
  • Enterolobium cyclocarpum
  • Cedrela odorata 
  • Tabebuia rosea 
  • Sterculia apetala
  • Hura crepitans

Description

  • This research evaluates the development and structure of eight native tree species in Panama growing in open, mixed plantations.
  • Saplings were up to 5 m tall.
  • Secondly, the authors examine whether the morphological differences between pioneer and non-pioneer species that are typically found in the forest are found in the open conditions of a plantation.
  • Pioneer species were Luehea seemannii, Cordia alliodora and Antirrhoea trichantha; non-pioneer species were Enterolobium cyclocarpum, Cedrela odorata, Tabebuia rosea, Sterculia apetala, and Hura crepitans.
  • Above-ground, pioneer species were taller than non-pioneer species and exhibited higher photosynthetic abilities.
  • Below-ground, biomass was similar between species but the allocation differed, with pioneers having shorter root length and less allocation to a taproot.
  • The authors suggest that the functional and structural differences between pioneer and non-pioneer trees are maintained in the plantation environment.

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Panama
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